The Mental Museum

Bai Yiluo

with 3 comments

Civilization, 2007

Born in 1968, Bai Yiluo is a contemporary artist from western China. His work, like that of many of his contemporaries, is influenced greatly by China’s relatively new socioeconomic structure. His work disassociates the viewer with any notion of individual characters, creating a feeling of isolation within solid and impenetrable unity. His structured, organized and controlled works represent China’s ancient history in the context of today’s society. One can’t help but reference Ancient China’s Terracotta Army discovered only recently in the 1970’s. Unearthed by local farmers near the Xi’an, Shaanxi province nearly 9,000 ancient statued soldiers and cavalry have been accounted. Built to protect the first emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang in his grave and in the afterlife, the ranked soldiers bore bronze weapons of that day and age, BC. However, the original weapons were stolen shortly after their creation, leaving the terracotta army unarmed, and the deceased Emperor and first empire metaphysically unprotected in its death. Yiluo’s recent work made also of terracotta titled Civilization introduces agricultural tools as weaponry, piercing and protecting itself from the busts of western classics. These long lost weapons from the first Chinese dynasty perhaps have experienced rebirth through Yiluo’s vision, representing conflict, revolution and the isochronal qualities of nature, art, history and the manifestation of civilization.

Fate No. 4

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Written by thementalmuseum

October 27, 2008 at 12:09 pm

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  1. […] Bai Yiluo Yiluo’s recent work made also of terracotta titled Civilization introduces agricultural tools as weaponry, piercing and protecting itself from the busts of western classics. These long lost weapons from the first Chinese dynasty perhaps … […]

  2. […] Bai Yiluo Yiluo’s recent work made also of terracotta titled Civilization introduces agricultural tools as weaponry, piercing and protecting itself from the busts of western classics. These long lost weapons from the first Chinese dynasty perhaps … […]

  3. […] Bai Yiluo Yiluo’s recent work made also of terracotta titled Civilization introduces agricultural tools as weaponry, piercing and protecting itself from the busts of western classics. These long lost weapons from the first Chinese dynasty perhaps … […]


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